Kerry Ziegler
Phone:  215-679-6877Office:  215-679-9797
Email:  kzhomes@comcast.netFax:  267-354-6922
Kerry Ziegler
Kerry Ziegler

My Blog

Renovating Your Bathroom? Think Safety First

September 20, 2017 5:17 am

A renovation can be a fun period where your wildest home-design ideas can be put into action. However, when planning out a brand new bathroom, it's important to keep safety in mind, especially if you have seniors or children living in your spaces. Moen notes that children younger than five account for more than half of all slips and falls in the bathroom.

Here are six tips from Moen to help make your bath safe and stylish:

Install grab bars. These bars can make or break a fall in the bathroom. The best places to install them are: 1) near the toilet, 2) along the showerhead wall and 3) on the back wall of the tub/shower.

Choose a dark grab bar. Darker finishes against a lighter wall allows those with impaired vision to easily find grab bars.

Love levers. Faucets with lever handles make turning the fixture on and off easier for everyone.

Go handheld. A handheld shower brings the water to you, which helps keep you safer and makes it easier to bathe children.

Shelf life. Keeping items (like shampoo) within reach on a shelf in your shower helps you avoid slips and falls.

Take a seat. Studies show that women are 72 percent more likely to be injured in the bath or shower than men. Add peace of mind with a shower seat to prevent slips during activities such as shaving legs.

Light it right. Consider three or four globe lights for a well-illuminated, safe bath.

Source: Moen

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Safety Warnings for Fidget Spinners

September 18, 2017 1:02 am

Any household where kids live or even visit today probably has a couple (or dozens) of fidget spinners lying around. However, I was recently contacted by the Consumer Product Safety Council about these clever new toys that are all the rage among our children.

On August 10 CPSC Acting Chairman Ann Marie Buerkle announced her agency was investigating some reported incidents that prompted a warning to parents and caregivers to keep fidget spinners and similarly branded toys from small children because the plastic and metal spinners can break and release small pieces that can be a choking hazard. Buerkle said there have also been reports of fires involving battery-operated fidget spinners.

She said it is key to use the charging cable that either comes with the fidget spinner or has correct connections for the device - charging cables are NOT interchangeable, Buerkle warns.

Also, if a fidget spinner is marketed and is primarily intended for children "12 years of age and younger," its manufacturer and/or retailer must certify it meets standards, including limits for phthalates, lead content, and lead in paint including the U.S Toy Standard ASTM F963-16 - and be labeled as such. So remember:

- Keep fidget spinners away from children under 3 years of age.

- Plastic and metal spinners have small pieces (including batteries) that can be a choking hazard. Choking incidents involving children up to age 14 have been reported.

- Warn children of all ages not to put fidget spinners or small pieces in their mouths or play with the fidget spinner near their faces.

And if you have battery-operated fidget spinners:

- Have working smoke alarms in your house to protect you if there is a fire.

- Be present when products with batteries are charging.

- Never charge a product with batteries overnight while you are sleeping.

- Always use the cable that came with the fidget spinner.

- If the fidget spinner did not come with a cable, use one with the correct connections for charging.

- Unplug your fidget spinner immediately once it is fully charged.

Buerkle urges consumers to visit the CPSC Fidget Spinner Safety Education Center for additional safety tips, and urges consumers to report fidget spinner safety incidents to CPSC at www.SaferProducts.gov.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Pro Gutter Cleaning Tips

September 18, 2017 1:02 am

Have you been putting off cleaning those gutters? Clearing out your gutters at least once a year is essential for avoiding overflow and backups. However, there are a variety of gutter cleaning tips that can bring sanity into this tedious task. Some of the basics are listed below, by gutter pro Robert Lenney, owner of Gutterglove, Inc.

Ladder Safety: Always let someone know you will be using a ladder to work on your roof or gutters. Use a safe and sturdy ladder, preferably with a small shelf strong enough to hold a five-gallon bucket to collect gutter debris. Make sure to secure the bucket with a lanyard. I recommend a four-legged step ladder for a single story home, and an extension ladder for a two-story home.

Garden Hose: Use a garden hose with a pistol-grip trigger spray nozzle. This type of spray nozzle allows you to adjust the water pressure with the use of just one hand.

Gutter Scoop: Scooping out the leafy debris seems to be the best overall method for cleaning out the gutter. An excellent tool for this job is the bright orange plastic "Gutter Getter" scoop, which can be purchased at most hardware stores.

Wear Gloves: Gloves can help protect hands against dirty, rotting leaf debris that often contains bird, pigeon and squirrel droppings that are ridden with bacteria. Gloves can also prevent painful cuts from the torn metal shards of an old, ragged gutter.

Protective Eye Wear:  Eye protection is a must because one never knows what might fly out of the downspout when cleaning gutters. People have experienced rats, birds, frogs, wasps and bees leaving at high speeds once they start removing a clog, and the last thing they want to have happen is an eye injury.

Rake Off Roof: Rake all debris off the roof first. Otherwise, the next rain will wash all the debris down into the clean gutter, clogging it up again.

Rubber Shoes: If walking on the roof is necessary to perform gutter cleaning, it is good to use rubber soled shoes. Rubber soles tend to adhere best and prevent slipping and falls.

Downspouts Unclogged: Make sure the downspouts (leader pipe) are clear. After all the gutters are cleaned out, run the water hose down the downspout at full pressure. If the water backs up out of the top, a clog is present.

Power Line Hazard: When cleaning gutters around a power line cable that drops from the power pole to the roof of a home, conduct a visual inspection of the electrical cable where it connects to the roof. This is to ensure that the protective wire insulation hasn't rubbed off through years of wear-and-tear by weather and nearby trees. If the cable appears to have damage, do not attempt to repair it. Call a licensed professional electrical contractor to fix it.

Gutter Guards: Using a quality gutter guard can eliminate the need for cleaning out gutters. Consider carefully the manufacturer's claims before purchasing a gutter protection system that keeps out leaves and pine needles, because many promises are made that can't be delivered. Lenney is the President and CEO of Gutterglove which is a manufacturer of top rated DIY and pro-install stainless steel micromesh gutter guards throughout North America.

Source: Gutterglove, Inc.
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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3 Safety Tips for Your Portable Generator

September 16, 2017 1:38 pm

In the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, and with winter storms heading our way, portable generator use is on the rise. However, generators can pose many safety risks, including carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning deaths. The Consumer Product Safety Commission is warning consumers to take three critical precautions to prevent loss of life from poisonous carbon monoxide when using a portable generator:

1. Never use a portable generator inside your home. One portable generator can emit the same amount of deadly carbon monoxide gas as hundreds of mid-size cars. Just as you would not leave a car running in a closed garage, do not run a generator inside a garage, home, shed or near open windows or vents.

2. Portable generators need air and distance. Place generators outdoors only, at least 20 feet away from your home.

3. Carbon monoxide is called the "invisible killer." This deadly gas is colorless and odorless and can quickly incapacitate and kill you and your family in minutes. A working CO alarm can detect high levels of the gas in your home. If it goes off, do not ignore it. Get out, then call 911.

Source: U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission
 
Hope you found these tips helpful. If you need any real estate information, please contact me.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Living Paycheck to Paycheck a Way of Life for Majority of U.S. Workers

September 16, 2017 1:38 pm

Are you counting the hours to pay day? You're not alone. More than three-quarters of workers (78 percent) are living paycheck to paycheck to make ends meet—up from 75 percent last year and a trait more common in women than men—81 vs. 75 percent, according to new CareerBuilder research. Thirty-eight percent of employees said they sometimes live paycheck to paycheck, 17 percent said they usually do, and 23 percent said they always do.

The national survey, which was conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of CareerBuilder this past spring, included representative samples of 2,369 full-time employers and 3,462 full-time U.S. workers across industries and company sizes in the private sector.

Having a higher salary doesn't necessarily mean money woes are behind you, with nearly one in 10 workers making $100,000 or more (9 percent) saying they usually or always live paycheck to paycheck and 59 percent in that income bracket in debt. Twenty-eight percent of workers making $50,000 -$99,999 usually or always live paycheck to paycheck, 70 percent are in debt; and 51 percent of those making less than $50,000 usually or always live paycheck to paycheck to make ends meet, while 73 percent are in debt.

Meanwhile, a quarter of workers (25 percent) haven't been able to make ends meet every month in the last year, and 20 percent have missed payment on some smaller bills. Further, 71 percent of all workers say they're in debt—up from 68 percent last year. While 46 percent say their debt is manageable, more than half of those in debt (56 percent) say they feel they will always be in debt. And it should be noted that 18 percent of all workers have reduced their 401k contribution and/or personal savings in the last year, more than a third (38 percent) do not participate in a 401k plan, IRA or comparable retirement plan, and 26 percent haven't set aside any savings each month in the last year.

Less than a third of workers (32 percent) stick to a clearly defined budget, and a slight majority (56 percent) save $100 or less a month:
  • None: 26 percent
  • Less than $50: 15 percent
  • $51 to $100: 16 percent
  • $101 to $250: 14 percent
  • $251 to $500: 11 percent
  • $501 to $750: 5 percent
  • $751 to $1,000: 4 percent
  • More than $1,000: 10 percent 
Still, despite financial woes, there are certain things employees aren't willing to give up. When asked what they'd absolutely not give up, regardless of financial concerns, employees cited:
  • Internet connection: 54 percent
  • Mobile device (smartphone, tablet, etc.): 53 percent
  • Driving: 48 percent
  • Pets: 37 percent
  • Cable: 21 percent
  • Going out to eat: 19 percent
  • Traveling: 17 percent
  • Education: 13 percent
  • Buying gifts for people: 13 percent
  • Alcohol: 11 percent
Source: CareerBuilder

If you’d like more homeowner information, please contact me.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Renters Want High-End Amenities and Sense of Community

September 16, 2017 1:38 pm

According to a nationwide survey of residents regarding their attitudes toward the rental market, renters are becoming more selective and amenity-driven, especially if those amenities make residences feel like true homes. In fact, only price and location were mentioned as more-important factors in housing decisions.

The results of the First Annual National Renters Index, a nationwide survey of residents regarding their attitudes toward the rental market from Village Green, also show that trends like micro-units and co-living housing are growing in popularity. Forty-eight percent of millennials stated interest in paying more for "high-end property amenities." More specifically, millennials said they were willing to spend more for properties outfitted with smart-home technologies (45 percent) and high-end facility amenities such as concierge service and/or a coffee bar (49 percent).

The Index also provided insight into where renters are looking for referrals and reviews as part of their search. Notably, 45 percent of renters said using third-party rental websites was important for their search, while 40 percent of renters mentioned online review sites as key resources and influencers for their housing hunt. This highlights the increasing importance of effective social media strategies, both proactive and reactive.

If you’d like more information about homeownership, please contact me.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Just Bought a Home? Here's What Not to Do

September 16, 2017 1:38 pm

Buying your first home is an exciting milestone, putting you on the path to a smart financial future. There are certain traps you can fall into as a new homeowner, however, that can put your financial well-being at risk. Avoid doing the following too soon:
  • Remodeling. Unless there’s something in need of serious repair, hold off on any remodeling projects. This will give you time to assess the cost vs. value of the project, ensuring that the money you put into it actually increases the value of your home. Waiting will also give you time to research and secure the best professionals to work with.
  • Furnishing the whole house. You don’t have to have every room perfectly outfitted at once. Take your time and settle in to your new home. This will give you time to make better furniture choices. It will also allow you to budget over time as opposed to a big financial hit all at once.
  • Taking out an equity loan. Let your equity serve as a cushion for future needs. As homeownership plays out, there are countless needs and issues that will arise. If you’ve already exhausted your equity, you won’t have that emergency fund at the ready.
  • Moving up. You might be on a mission to get to your next bigger and better home as soon as possible, but wait it out a bit. You want to make sure you have the finances to do so comfortably, and you want to make sure you choose the right location. Living in your current home will teach you a lot about your likes and dislikes.
  • Making major aesthetic changes. Don’t go crazy with paint, wallpaper or any other bold design statements just yet. You’re still in the getting-to-know-you phase, so feel your new home out for a while before you start changing its look.
If you need more real estate information, feel free to contact me.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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6 Tips for Filing an Insurance Claim After a Storm

September 16, 2017 1:38 pm

Whether reporting storm damage to your property over the phone or through your mobile device, the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) offers the following tips on how to file an insurance claim:
  1. Contact your insurer as soon as possible to begin the process. Provide your insurer with your policy number and the best phone number and email address at which to reach you. After a major storm, insurers visit those with the most severe damage first. Be prepared to provide an accurate description of the extent of the property damage. Explain any special needs of your family, particularly if personal circumstances require that you get priority. Ask your insurer when you can expect to be contacted by an insurance adjuster so you're ready for the visit. Since adjusters may be in areas in which cellphone towers are damaged, it's also a good idea to get the phone number of your adjuster's supervisor so you have an additional contact. If you have a flood insurance claim, contact the agent or broker who sold you the policy to start the claims filing process.
  2. Document your loss. The insurance adjuster will most likely inspect the damage to your home, auto and possessions in order to write a check to help you replace, repair and rebuild. It's a good idea to take photographs and document the details of damaged items, including the date of purchase and approximate value—and collect receipts, if you have them. Many companies will ask you to submit an inventory of the items.
  3. Check with your insurer before discarding damaged items and materials. You will generally need to show storm damaged items to your adjuster. If, however, you're required by your local municipality to discard them for safety reasons, take photographs to help with the claims process.
  4. Sign up for SMS/text alerts. Many insurance companies use SMS/text message alerts that will notify you of the status of your claim. You will receive text messages on your phone when you first report your claim, when your estimate is available, and when a payment has been sent.
  5. Know what emergency services are available. In the event you need emergency services, such as removing water from your home, covering your roof, or boarding up windows or doors, many companies will dispatch an approved emergency services company to protect your home from further damage. If your home has sustained severe damage, making it unlivable, your homeowners insurer will provide you with a check for additional living expenses.
  6. Keep a claim diary. Good record-keeping is important when filing a claim. Make a list of everyone you speak to about your claim. Note their name, title and contact information. Also, keep track of the date, time and issues discussed. The more organized you are, the simpler and easier the claims process will be. 
Source: Insurance Information Institute

If you’d like more homeowner information, please contact me.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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In this Edition: Insurance Claims

September 16, 2017 1:38 pm

Our lead story in this month’s Home Matters examines six tips to keep in mind when filing an insurance claim after a storm. Other topics covered this month include what not to do after purchasing a home and how to safely use your portable generator. We hope you enjoy this month’s edition of Home Matters and as always, we welcome your feedback. Email us anytime!

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Simple Ways to Make Healthy Lifestyle Choices

September 15, 2017 1:17 am

(Family Features)--When it comes to creating a healthy lifestyle, some recommendations are fairly simple, such as exercising regularly and eating right. Many people, however, don't know how much exercise they should get or which foods are the best choices. They also may not realize there are other ways to take care of your body and mind to promote better overall health.

Start on the path to healthier living with these tips from the wellness experts at Walgreens.

Exercise regularly
The American Heart Association recommends at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity at least five days a week, and that's because an active lifestyle can help you achieve far more than muscle mass or weight loss. Regular exercise can also contribute to mental well-being, and even something as simple as a walking break or two at work can provide health benefits.

Eat well
The keys to a healthy diet are eating the right amount of calories for your activity level and eating a wide range of foods to ensure that you're receiving all the nutrients your body needs. 

Get enough sleep
Sleep plays a vital role in good health and well-being, and can help improve your mental health, physical health and quality of life. The National Sleep Foundation recommends 7-9 hours per night for adults and 9-11 hours for school-aged children. If you find sleep elusive, try implementing a bedtime routine to send signals to your body that it's time to sleep, avoid screen time immediately before lights out and eliminate caffeine after lunch.

Manage stress
Between juggling a career, family and other commitments, it's easy to find things to stress over. Practices such as meditation and yoga can help to better manage stress. Setting aside time for a favorite hobby can also help relieve stress and focus on an activity you enjoy. Aside from mental and emotional impacts, stress can also impact your physical health, so it's important to identify coping mechanisms that reduce overall stress.

Be social
Making time to socialize with friends and family is an important part of living a long and healthy life. Even if your schedule is packed, try to block out time at least once a week to spend with family and friends.
Break bad habits

Whatever their nature, work to break bad habits by first acknowledging the problem then working to replace the negativity with alternatives that make a more positive impact on your life.  Even a negative attitude can bring you down.

Source: walgreens.com/nice.

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