Kerry Ziegler
Phone:  215-679-6877Office:  215-679-9797
Email:  kzhomes@comcast.netFax:  267-354-6922
Kerry Ziegler
Kerry Ziegler

My Blog

Turkey Talk: Thanksgiving Tabletop Décor with a Twist

November 6, 2015 2:43 am

(BPT)—Without a doubt, the turkey majorly influences all things Thanksgiving, right down to our tabletop décor. Turkeys and the platters they’re served on have a colorful history, nearly as old as the holiday itself.

"You can find a turkey platter that will blend well with any china pattern, from the very old to the very new," says designer Julie Robbins. "Turkey platters aren't necessarily bird-themed; you'll find them in designs ranging from florals to even scenic vistas. I suggest starting a wonderful family tradition of dedicating a special platter for your Thanksgiving turkey and making it the centerpiece of your holiday gathering."

Lenox and several other manufacturers produce turkey-shaped platters and other autumn themed serving pieces in alternative metal serveware. This is a special alloy that maintains a constant temperature to keep foods warm or cold when heated or chilled.

Whether you're planning a huge buffet or an intimate dinner with close family and friends, Robbins says the color trends for Thanksgiving entertaining remain a bright version of fall: strong oranges, sages and brilliant turquoises.  Both individual candles and groupings of candles are also popular picks for the Thanksgiving tabletop.

If Tom Turkey isn't the right design element for your table, Robbins says you can still create a seasonal feel, minus the bird.

"You can use fall leaf or even woodland patterns to create a classic Thanksgiving table without going with a turkey motif. Beautiful classic fruit patterns give your table that horn of plenty flair,” Robbins says.

To tie this look together, Robbins suggests combining whole spices, such as cinnamon and nutmeg, with natural elements like nuts, small pumpkins, fall fruits and colorful leaves to create a cornucopia-type centerpiece.

Source: Replacements, Ltd.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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The Top 5 Energy-Saving Window Treatments

November 6, 2015 2:43 am

Did you know certain window coverings can provide energy savings of up to 10 percent a month? Advancements in window treatments have led to increased energy efficiency in many models manufactured today. The most energy-efficient of these include:

Cellular Shades – Cellular shades are often called honeycomb shades. The shade is made of individual cells that trap air inside them and significantly help control the temperature of a room.

Indoor Shutters – Indoor shutters are still one of the most classic window coverings and they are very energy-efficient in design. Wood shutters offer plenty of charm to a room and are very easy to clean and maintain. They offer great insulation by trapping air between the window and shutter.

Blackout Drapes – The beauty of drapes is they can offer a soft, colorful look that many people love in a room while at the same time providing energy efficiency. When shopping for drapes, purchase ones with thick lining that will protect the interior from summer sun and winter cold. For maximum energy efficiency and appeal, hang drapes high and wide around the windows.

Window Films – Window films are thin sheets of plastic that you can adhere directly to your window panes in order to help insulate and privatize your home. You can also install reflective films that reflect the warm rays of the sun away from your home.

Roman Shades – Roman shades are a cost-effective window treatment for energy saving as long as they are properly selected and installed. Roller shades can help insulate your home from heat and cold transfer.

Source: San Diego Window Fashions

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Technology: The Bane or Boon of Society?

November 5, 2015 2:40 am

As technology seeps into seemingly every aspect of everyday life—and with familiarity so often breeding contempt—it should come as no surprise that it rubs some of us the wrong way. In fact, according to a recent Harris Poll®, many remain divided on how technology impacts the way we live our lives.

On the one hand, strong majorities believe that technology has improved the overall quality of our lives and encourages us to be more creative; at the same time, strong majorities also believe technology is creating a lazy society, is too distracting, is corrupting interpersonal communications, and is having a negative impact on literacy.

Technology has, however, had a positive effect on our ability to learn new skills, according to the poll. Over four in 10 surveyed say technology has also had a positive effect on their relationships with friends, their ability to live life the way they want, their happiness, and their social life. A plurality says the same of its effect on their work productivity and their work life.

In contrast, nearly one quarter of poll respondents believe technology has not had a positive effect on their productivity at home, possibly due to the fact that we still have a hard time unplugging. When faced with a list of technological devices and general life staples and asked how long they could live without each, majorities indicate they could make it a week or less without Internet access, a computer or laptop, a mobile phone or television.

Source: The Harris Poll®

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Finally! How to Get and Keep an Organized Garage

November 5, 2015 2:40 am

When’s the last time you parked your car in your garage? For most homeowners, garages are catch-alls for everything from outdoor furniture to bulk grocery items. In fact, according to a recent Gladiator® GarageWorks survey, one-fourth of Americans can’t fit even one car in their garage.

“The garage can be the forgotten room of the home, but it can be such a useful resource for homeowners,” says Karl Champley, master builder and home improvement television and radio personality.

To make the most of the space in your garage, Champley recommends the following organizational tips:

1. Have a Game Plan

The garage can be many different things to different homeowners, so it’s important to determine what purpose the garage needs to serve. While the majority of homeowners use it for parking the car and household storage, many people use their garage for hobbies and personal projects.

Try dividing your garage into "zones" with specific areas for lawn and garden equipment, sporting goods, tools and other hobbies. Once a plan is established, it is much easier to begin the organization process.

2. Eliminate the Waste

Garage too cluttered? Holding a garage sale or dropping off boxes of donated items to a community donation center are two great ways to recycle unused items. Homeowners should remember that disposing of old paint containers or automotive fluids should be done properly. Bottom line: get as many unused items out of the garage as possible.

3. Maximize the Space

Three out of four homeowners surveyed said they wish their garage was better organized. One way is to have a garage storage solution that takes advantage of the wall space that garages provide.

"Getting items like boxes and bikes off of the garage floor with modular hooks and shelving is a big plus for homeowners," says Champley. "It frees up significant floor space for cars and other items."

4. Take Pride in the Garage

An ideal garage organization system grows with homeowners as they grow, while providing functional, flexible storage options for a number of different products.

"Some people take great pride in the brand of car they drive, the brand of lawnmower they ride or the tools they own, but may not put that same amount of pride into how they store those expensive items," says Champley. "You really want to make sure you take the same pride in garage storage as you do with the items you are storing."

Source: Gladiator® GarageWorks

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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5 Maintenance Tips to Fireproof Your Home

November 5, 2015 2:40 am

Regular maintenance of your home’s systems and appliances not only prolongs their lifespan, but also helps prevent accidental fire. To keep your family and home safe from disaster, follow these maintenance guidelines, courtesy of the National Home Service Contract Association (NHSCA).

Clothes Dryer
According to the National Fire Protection Association, clothes dryers and washing machines were involved in one out of every 22 home structure fires reported to U.S. fire departments between 2006 and 2010.

Most of those involved dryers, and many of them were due to buildup of dust and lint in the clothes dryer exhaust duct. Make sure to not only clean out the lint trap with each use, but also occasionally clean the dryer exhaust duct and behind and under the appliance as well. The leading cause of home clothes dryer and washer fires was a failure to clean.

Electrical System
Have a licensed electrician review your home every 10 years. Small upgrades and simple safety checks, like making sure outdoor grounds and connections are secure, can prevent larger problems.

It is also a good idea to do a visual inspection of anything electrical to be sure there are no frayed cords or wires and any exposed wiring.

Look in the attic and crawl spaces for wiring which appears to have been damaged by pests or insects. Some old wiring is insulated with material insects eat or chew on, and squirrels or other rodents will often chew the insulation off.

Warning signs that may indicate a potential problem with your homes electrical system include frequently blown fuses or tripped circuit breakers, dim or flickering lights, overheated plugs, cords, or switches, and bulbs that wear out too fast.

Fire Detectors
Test your fire detectors to make sure they work and refresh the batteries. Take the time to check all of the detectors in the home. If you feel specific rooms that do not have a fire detector may need one, now is a good time to add them.

Furnace
Your furnace should be cleaned and inspected annually by a qualified HVAC technician. The older the furnace, the more important this service is. Newer gas furnaces are equipped with many features that shut the furnace off when a problem is detected.

If you perceive a dusty or burnt smell when turning on your furnace for the season, there is likely no need for concern. The majority of the time it’s just burning the dust out of the combustion chamber due to lack of use. Changing your furnace air filter may help, but if the odor persists, call a technician.

If you think you are saving money by closing vents in rooms not utilized during colder months, think again. Blocking vents actually causes the system to work harder, and if you close off more than 20 percent of the registers in your house, it can cause high resistance and unnecessary heat buildup in the furnace.

Change your furnace filter at least once every three months. If you plan to have any remodeling work done in your home, be sure to change the filter once it’s completed as dust, dry wall debris and other byproducts of such work can clog the filter much more quickly.

Water Heater
The most common problem with water heaters is failure that causes flooding, but water heaters can also cause house fires. Take the time to inspect your water heater at least once a year. Remove paper, accumulated dust or other combustibles from the heater enclosure.

Many experts suggest keeping boxes and other storage items at least three feet away from the furnace or water heater.

If you live in an area prone to earthquakes, like California, water heaters must be properly strapped so that they don’t fall over during an earthquake. Water heaters weigh several hundred pounds when full, so a proper seismic strapping kit must be installed.

Home service contracts cover service, repair or replacement of the major systems and appliances in your home that fail due to normal wear and tear. Heating and electrical systems as well as appliances including oven/range, water heater, kitchen refrigerator, dishwasher, garbage disposal, trash compactor and specialty items such as built-in bathtub whirlpool, and central vacuum systems are items generally covered in a home service contract. Optional coverage is also available, and varies by state.

Source: NHSCA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Maintenance, Proper Use Key to Efficient Home Heating

November 4, 2015 2:40 pm

Homeowners should consider how to make the most of their home heating budgets before cooler weather sets in. “Learning how to operate your home heating appliances and then taking care of them through routine maintenance are two of the best things a homeowner can do to save money on heating this season,” says Ashley Eldridge, director of Education for the Chimney Safety Institute of America (CSIA).

Since most homeowners operate their heating appliances for only a season or two, it’s important to dust off installation and operation manuals and review the basics. If you are unsure about how to operate your home heating appliance and the owner’s manual cannot be found or does not make sense, call a qualified chimney professional that can show you not only how the heating and venting systems work, but also how to do your part for the environment when heating your home.

Annual inspections by a professional can also help you identify potential issues with your chimney, which may need to be addressed, including creosote buildup, obstructions like bird nests, or cracks which may cause noxious gases to be released inside the home. A good rule of thumb is that your chimney needs to be swept when there is an eighth of a inch of accumulated creosote in the system.

Source: CSIA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Greener Homes Start with ENERGY STAR

November 4, 2015 2:40 pm

Want to save money at home without sacrificing comfort or convenience? Start with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) ENERGY STAR® program, the world’s most widely recognized symbol for energy efficiency that saves families and businesses $300 billion on utility bills while reducing carbon pollution by two billion metric tons.

Even something as simple as a new light bulb can help save money and energy—in fact, an ENERGY STAR light bulb consumes up to 90 percent less energy over its lifetime, saving between $30 and $80.

You can reduce your impact even further by choosing a clean energy resource to power your home. Many areas offer electricity options that include generating sources that emit no or negligible air emissions, such as from wind or solar power. As the price of these energy sources continues to fall, you can start saving even more money on your electricity bills while reducing your carbon footprint. To find out which options are available in your area, consult EPA’s Green Power Locator (1.usa.gov/1S6vsGI).

Source: EPA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Is a 'Failure to Launch' Eating Your Household Budget?

November 4, 2015 2:40 pm

As more multigenerational living arrangements take hold in American homes, many homeowners find themselves providing financial support for their adult children. In fact, more than half of those polled in a recent American Consumer Credit Counseling (ACCC) survey report they are footing some of the bills for at least one child over age 24—the most common of which is housing.

“Parenting doesn’t end when your children reach age 18 and, for many people, neither does the financial responsibility of supporting them,” says Steve Trumble, president and CEO of American Consumer Credit Counseling. “Setting aside the often crushing burden of student loan debt, everyday expenses for adult children are something parents are trying to manage every day.”

Respondents to the survey also report supporting their adult children with household bills, providing transportation and covering medical expenses, despite the fact that 65 percent of those adult children are employed.

Over 25 percent of those polled say they’re providing over $250 a month in financial support to their adult children; nearly 15 percent are spending over $500 a month. More than three-quarters of respondents believe providing that support is hindering their ability to save.

ACCC is a national nonprofit that helps consumers with budgeting, financial education and debt management.

Source: ACCC

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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5 Disaster Preparedness Tips for Seniors

November 4, 2015 2:40 pm

They say with age comes wisdom—and when it comes to weathering disasters like fire, flood or hurricane, older individuals and their caregivers would be wise to prepare, according to the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.).

Older individuals are particularly vulnerable to disaster, as they may have special needs, and seniors may also have trouble keeping up with the routine maintenance necessary for protecting their home. To be prepared, the I.I.I. suggests the following tips:

1. Have a disaster kit on hand with the supplies you need if you have to evacuate or manage on your own for a period after a disaster. For a full list of disaster supply items, visit Ready.gov.

2. Keep an up-to-date file of medical history including doctors, prescriptions and dosages. Include a copy in your disaster kit.

3. Plan for an evacuation by first learning if you are in an evacuation zone. Your local county government or municipality can provide this information.

4. Keep your homeowners insurance up-to-date, and continue to insure your home even if it is paid off. To ease the claims filing process, keep an up-to-date home inventory.

5. Consider flood and earthquake coverage as neither are provided under standard homeowners and renters policies. Flood insurance is available from FEMA’s National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

Source: I.I.I.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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4 Maintenance Tasks to Complete when Daylight Savings Ends

November 4, 2015 2:40 pm

With Daylight Saving Time at an end, now is a good time to tick the boxes on this home maintenance checklist, courtesy of the Mister Sparky® experts.

Test your smoke alarms.
The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) recommends testing your smoke alarms each month and replacing the batteries at least once a year. They also recommend replacing all smoke alarms every 10 years.

Check outdoor lighting.
Inspect all the wiring and light bulbs on your outdoor lighting. With less daylight, proper lighting outside can help ensure safety and security. There are new, LED, outdoor lighting options that can help save energy.

Check your timers.
Outdoor lighting timers, pool pumps and yard sprinklers need to be seasonally adjusted. Pools in the cooler seasons only need to be on an hour or two to circulate chemicals.

Save energy.
According to the Department of Energy,  upgrading to energy-efficient light bulbs and motion-sensing light switches in places like walk-in closets, dim pantries and hallways consumes 25-80 percent less energy than traditional light bulbs, saving you money on your monthly utility bills.

Source: Mister Sparky® Electricians

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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